David Brooks & Peter Block: How to Know a Person

The Common Good podcast is a conversation about the significance of place, eliminating economic isolation and structures of belonging.

This episode is the Abundant Community Conversation from September 14 where Troy Bronsink speaks with David Brooks and Peter Block about David’s new book, How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen. This event was produced in partnership with Designed LearningFaith Matters NetworkAbundant Community and Common Change. These conversations happen on Zoom and they always contain poetry, small groups and an exploration of a particular theme.

The recited excerpts came from Reverend Ben McBride’s book, Troubling the Water: The Urgent Work of Radical Belonging. You can also check out our previous conversation with Ben here.

Peter also has a new book coming out in November that you can pre-order now. It’s called Activating the Common Good: Reclaiming Control of Our Collective Well-Being.

This episode was produced by Joey Taylor and the music is from Jeff Gorman. You can find more information about the Common Good Collective here. Common Good Podcast is a production of Bespoken Live & Common Change – Eliminating Personal Economic Isolation.

Image by Freepik.

Going Further:

About the Lead Author

David Brooks
David Brooks became an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times in September 2003. He is currently a commentator on “PBS NewsHour,” NPR’s “All Things Considered” and NBC’s “Meet the Press.” He is the author of “Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There” and “On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense.” In March 2011 he came out with his third book, “The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement,” which was a No. 1 New York Times best seller. His most recent book is “The Second Mountain.” Mr. Brooks also teaches at Yale University, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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