Peacemaking Powers and the Culture They Create

As we look to the abundance within neighborhoods waiting to come alive, one of the best starting places is to seek out those gifts, skills and talents are possessed by the people who live there. Our first instinct to do so may lead us toward “hard skills” — for instance, building, making music, teaching, or raising children. Yet what about the “softer” skills that exist among neighbors? 

In his most recent writing, “Learning 35: Peacemaking Powers and the Culture They Create,” John McKnight offers there are at least six powerful characteristics of neighbors that also empower their neighborhood: cooperation, hospitality, generosity, kindness, accepting fallibilities and forgiveness.

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